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Chard School remembers

Chard School remembers

Today, the school held a Remembrance Service during which parents, children and members of the Old Cerdics Association remembered the sacrifice and contribution to the war effort made by the school during the First World War. For a small school, the numbers of former pupils who became casualties of the war is truly amazing. 78 boys names are recorded on the Roll of Honour, which is an enormous figure and one which reflects the school’s contribution to the conflict. The Roll of Honour was read by OCA Vice President and retired RAF Air Commodore, Nigel Griffiths supported by Col. Paul Richardson, Commandant Somerset ACF.

The establishment of the country’s first and only specialist hospital for amputees in one of the school’s buildings, Monmouth House, situated at Fore Street, was another aspect of the school’s history featured in the service. Year 6 pupils gave talks on this and other aspects of the First World War that they had each researched. One boy talked about his great grandparents’ experience of surviving the sinking of the Lusitania when it was sunk by the Germans. The children looked at propaganda from the period and sung many of the songs the troops would have sung during the war, including ‘Pack up your troubles’ and ‘Keep the Home Fires Burning’. Children from Year 6 recited the poem ‘Last Post’ by Carol Ann Duffy. The service was attended by many ‘Old Cerdics’ who travelled from and wide to join the Chard School community in this year that marks the 100th anniversary of the day Britain engendered on of the costliest conflicts in history – the First World War. Everyone agreed it was a moving and interesting commemoration of the events of the First World War.

Chairman of the Old Cerdics Association, Graham Chamberlain, a pupil at the end of WW2 said “It was a very proud moment for all Old Cerdics present to join the Chard School community in honouring so many former pupils that had made the ultimate sacrifice, so that in later years other pupils could be free to attend the school.”